Russian hackers targeted election officials just days before presidential vote

Russian hackers targeted election officials just days before presidential vote

Russian hackers targeted election officials just days before presidential vote

Russian hacking groups played a larger role in the 2016 election than anyone realized, according to a top secret NSA report published today in The Intercept. That campaign includes targeting a supplier of US voting software, as well as sending spear-phishing emails to more than 100 local election officials just days before Election Day. The result is a troubling new turn in Russian hacking efforts, although there’s no indication the group had access to voting totals or election results.

The Intercept report comes after a string of hacks in the run-up to the 2016 Election, when hackers stole and published emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton campaign. In January, the Director of National Intelligence attributed those leaks to a Russian influence campaign ordered directly by Russian president Vladimir Putin. Putin himself has denied directly ordering the campaign, saying instead that it may have been carried out by “patriots” sympathetic to Russian interests.

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Fiat Chrysler reportedly facing US criminal probe in emission scandal

Fiat Chrysler reportedly facing US criminal probe in emission scandal

Fiat Chrysler reportedly facing US criminal probe in emission scandal

A few days after being accused by the Environmental Protection Agency of cheating on its emissions tests, Fiat Chrysler is now being investigated by the Justice Department for failing to disclose secret software that allegedly facilitated the fraud, according to Bloomberg.

Earlier this week, an EPA administrator said FCA’s software appeared to be in violation of the Clean Air Act and was likely contributing to “illegal pollution.” The EPA stopped short of calling the software “defeat devices,” but has sent a request to Fiat Chrysler asking them to prove otherwise. The vehicles in question include Jeep Grand Cherokees from 2014 to 2016, and Dodge Ram 1500 Trucks.

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Spotify executive among those killed in Stockholm truck attack

Spotify executive among those killed in Stockholm truck attack

Spotify executive among those killed in Stockholm truck attack

A Spotify executive was among those killed during an attack in Stockholm on Friday, CEO Daniel Ek has confirmed. Chris Bevington, who had worked at Spotify for five years and served as its director of global partnerships and business development, was hit by a truck driven deliberately into pedestrians while walking in one of Stockholm’s shopping areas.

Ek paid tribute to the British-born Bevington via Facebook, saying that as a member of “our band,” he had a great impact on “not just the business but on everyone who had the privilege to know and work with him.”

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@POTUS now belongs to Donald Trump

@POTUS now belongs to Donald Trump

@POTUS now belongs to Donald Trump

Donald J. Trump has just been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States. With that title comes the official Twitter account, which has been just been turned over to him and his staff.

The @POTUS handle was originated under President Barack Obama back in 2015, but his tweets have since been moved over to the @POTUS44 account. Trump will keep his @realDonaldTrump account, of course. We’re still waiting for President Trump’s first tweet, but it will almost certainly have something to do with making America great again.

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The WannaCry ransomware attack has spread to 150 countries

The WannaCry ransomware attack has spread to 150 countries

The WannaCry ransomware attack has spread to 150 countries

Since its discovery on Friday afternoon, the WannaCry ransomware attack has continued to spread this weekend, impacting over 10,000 organizations and 200,000 individuals in over 150 countries, according to European authorities. However, while measures have been taken to slow the spread of the malware, new variations have begun to surface.

This morning, Europol director Rob Wainwright told the BBC that the cyberattack is “unprecedented in its scale,” and noted that it will likely continue as people return to work on Monday. While Microsoft took the unusual step to issue a patch for Windows XP, the patch will only work if installed, and authorities have been warning businesses to ensure that their systems are updated.

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New EPA head is awfully friendly with the industry he should regulate, emails show

New EPA head is awfully friendly with the industry he should regulate, emails show

New EPA head is awfully friendly with the industry he should regulate, emails show

The new administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, Scott Pruitt, closely worked with major oil and gas companies, electric utilities, and political groups to undo environmental regulations, according to more than 7,000 pages of emails made public today. Pruitt now leads the government agency responsible for protecting the environment and regulating pollution.

Pruitt was ordered to release the emails by an Oklahoma judge, in response to a lawsuit by the Center for Media and Democracy. Democrats had urged the Senate Republican majority leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky to delay Pruitt’s confirmation hearing until after the emails were released, but with no success. Pruitt was confirmed as head of the EPA just five days ago.

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The US military can now shoot down consumer drones it considers a threat

The US military can now shoot down consumer drones it considers a threat

The US military can now shoot down consumer drones it considers a threat

The Pentagon has approved a new policy allowing military bases to shoot down private and commercial drones that are considered a threat. As reported by Military Times, the policy was first sent out in July, and though the exact contents are classified, it contains details on how to engage with drones when they are approaching or enter a military no-fly zone.

Pentagon spokesman Navy Capt. Jeff Davis says the infringing drones can be seized and that “the new guidance does afford of the ability to take action to stop these threats and that includes disabling, destroying, and tracking.” How a base responds to a drone “will depend upon the specific circumstances.”

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Zuckerberg to Trump: ‘Keep our doors open to refugees’

Zuckerberg to Trump: ‘Keep our doors open to refugees’

Zuckerberg to Trump: ‘Keep our doors open to refugees’

Mark Zuckerberg pushed back on President Donald Trump’s immigration initiatives today, protesting his call for local law enforcement to enforce immigration laws and his produced reduction in the number of refugees. “Like many of you, I’m concerned about the impact of the recent executive orders signed by President Trump,” Zuckerberg wrote in a Facebook post today. At the same time, Zuckerberg praised Trump’s vague pledge to “work something out” for undocumented immigrants who arrived in the country as children. “I’m also glad the president believes our country should continue to benefit from ‘people of great talent coming into the country,’” Zuckerberg said, quoting Trump.

The post doesn’t quite rise to the level of criticism, but it does reflect an increasing willingness to challenge Trump’s policies inside Facebook. (Yesterday, its chief operating officer, Sheryl Sandberg, offered a mild rebuke to Trump’s revival of a Reagan-era policy that withholds international aid to health organizations that offer abortion counseling.)

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It’s official: your internet provider can share your web history

It's official: your internet provider can share your web history

It’s official: your internet provider can share your web history

In a major blow to consumer privacy, President Trump signed a resolution today reversing an Obama-era rule that restricted what internet providers could do with their customers’ data.

Most notably, the privacy rule would have prevented internet providers from using, sharing, or selling a subscriber’s web browsing history without first getting their explicit permission. The rule also required internet providers to take “reasonable” steps to secure data from hackers and to notify customers in the event of a breach.

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Cyber Monday was dominated by mobile sales

Cyber Monday was dominated by mobile sales

Cyber Monday was dominated by mobile sales

This year’s Cyber Monday was the biggest sales day for online and for mobile ever in the US. Online sales brought in $6.59 billion in total, while sales on mobile broke a new record by reaching $2 billion. Mobile also dominated over desktop for the first time for Shopify merchants, which include brands as varied as Tesla Motors and Kylie Cosmetics, according to the company.

Part of this is because retailer apps and mobile wallet services have made it easier than ever to shop on your iPhone or Android device, Business Insider reports. Seventy-five percent of millennials were more likely to shop on their smartphones than on computers, according to Adobe Analytics data.

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