Defendant who texted teen to commit suicide sentenced to 15 months in jail

Defendant who texted teen to commit suicide sentenced to 15 months in jail

Defendant who texted teen to commit suicide sentenced to 15 months in jail

A Massachusetts woman convicted of involuntary manslaughter because of text messages that cajoled her 18-year-old friend to commit suicide was sentenced Thursday to serve 15 months in jail.

Michelle Carter, now 20, faced a maximum 20-year prison term. Her unusual prosecution was closely watched, and it occurred in a state that has no law forbidding people from encouraging suicide. But the authorities—including a Bristol County judge—concluded that in 2014 Carter sent Conrad Roy text messages that wantonly and recklessly caused him to poison himself in a car with carbon monoxide. She was 17 years old at the time.

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Georgia’s lax voting security exposed just in time for crucial special election

Georgia’s lax voting security exposed just in time for crucial special election

Georgia’s lax voting security exposed just in time for crucial special election

To understand why many computer scientists and voting rights advocates don’t trust the security of many US election systems, consider the experience of Georgia-based researcher Logan Lamb. Last August, after the FBI reported hackers were probing voter registration systems in more than a dozen states, Lamb decided to assess the security of voting systems in his state.

According to a detailed report published Tuesday in Politico, Lamb wrote a simple script that would pull documents off the website of Kennesaw State University’s Center for Election Systems, which under contract with Georgia, tests and programs voting machines for the entire state. By accident, Lamb’s script uncovered a breach whose scope should concern both Republicans and Democrats alike. Reporter Kim Zetter writes:

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Apple must pay $506M for infringing university’s patent

Apple must pay $506M for infringing university’s patent

Apple must pay $506M for infringing university’s patent

A judge has ordered Apple to pay $506 million to the research arm of the University of Wisconsin.

Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation, or WARF, sued Apple in 2014, accusing its A7, A8, and A8X chips of infringing US Patent No. 5,781,752, which claims a type of “table based data speculation circuit.” The following year after a trial, a Wisconsin jury found (PDF) that Apple had infringed the ‘752 patent and that it should pay $234 million in damages.

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President Trump fires FBI Director James Comey over Clinton e-mail probe

President Trump fires FBI Director James Comey over Clinton e-mail probe

President Trump fires FBI Director James Comey over Clinton e-mail probe

FBI Director James Comey was fired Tuesday by President Donald Trump over his handling of the Hillary Clinton e-mail scandal. A search has begun to replace Comey, who was appointed to the position by President Barack Obama in 2013.

“The FBI is one of our nation’s most cherished and respected institutions, and today will mark a new beginning for our crown jewel of law enforcement,” President Trump said in a statement. Comey’s removal was recommended by Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.

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FBI confirms probe of possible collusion between Trump campaign, Russia

FBI confirms probe of possible collusion between Trump campaign, Russia

FBI confirms probe of possible collusion between Trump campaign, Russia

FBI Director James Comey said Monday that there was “no information” that President Donald Trump was wiretapped by President Barack Obama during the 2016 presidential election. The director, testifying before a House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, also said that the agency was probing whether there was collusion between the Trump campaign and the Russian government. The US intelligence community has suggested that Russia hacked the Democratic National Committee during the election to embarrass Trump’s presidential rival, Hillary Clinton.

“I have been authorized by the Department of Justice to confirm that the FBI, as part of our counter-intelligence mission, is investigating the Russian government’s efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election, and that includes investigating the nature of any links between individuals associated with the Trump campaign and the Russian government, and whether there was any coordination between the campaign and Russia’s efforts. As with any counter-intelligence investigation, this will also include an assessment of whether any crimes were committed,” Comey said.

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Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

The recent furor over a Google-funded think tank firing an anti-Google scholar has inspired Gizmodo journalist Kashmir Hill to tell a story about the time Google used its power to squash a story that was embarrassing to the company.

The incident occurred in 2011. Hill was a cub reporter at Forbes, where she covered technology and privacy. At the time, Google was actively promoting Google Plus and was sending representatives to media organizations to encourage them to add “+1” buttons to their sites. Hill was pulled into one of these meetings, where the Google representative suggested that Forbes would be penalized in Google search results if it didn’t add +1 buttons to the site.

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Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

Reporter: Google successfully pressured me to take down critical story

The recent furor over a Google-funded think tank firing an anti-Google scholar has inspired Gizmodo journalist Kashmir Hill to tell a story about the time Google used its power to squash a story that was embarrassing to the company.

The incident occurred in 2011. Hill was a cub reporter at Forbes, where she covered technology and privacy. At the time, Google was actively promoting Google Plus and was sending representatives to media organizations to encourage them to add “+1” buttons to their sites. Hill was pulled into one of these meetings, where the Google representative suggested that Forbes would be penalized in Google search results if it didn’t add +1 buttons to the site.

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State attorneys general team up to scare you from “content theft sites”

State attorneys general team up to scare you from “content theft sites”

State attorneys general team up to scare you from “content theft sites”

Fifteen state attorneys general have teamed up with a pro-Hollywood group to launch a campaign aimed at dissuading the public from visiting file sharing sites.

To be sure, it’s true that ads and other content on piracy sites can infect unsuspecting visitors with malware. But these attorneys general, in conjunction the Digital Citizens Alliance (DCA), really want you to know that visiting pirate sites can ruin both your life and your family’s life. The scary black-hooded hacker on their video messages says it all.

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Trump election commission stops collecting personal voter data—for now

Trump election commission stops collecting personal voter data—for now

Trump election commission stops collecting personal voter data—for now

The Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity made headlines on June 28 when it requested that states hand over registered voters’ full names, political affiliations, addresses, dates of birth, criminal records, the last four digits of their Social Security numbers, and other personal identifying information. The government wants to make all of the data public. Many of the states deem varying parts of the data private—meaning state law forbids them from divulging it.

So far, Arkansas is the only state that has complied with the commission’s demands. But the commission, put together by President Donald Trump amid allegations of voter fraud on a massive scale during the 2016 election, said it has erased Arkansas’ data. And now the commission, which (among other topics) wants to investigate whether dead people voted in elections the past decade, is telling the rest of the states they don’t need to comply—at least for now.

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Lawsuit: Amazon sold eclipse glasses that cause “permanent blindness”

Lawsuit: Amazon sold eclipse glasses that cause “permanent blindness”

Lawsuit: Amazon sold eclipse glasses that cause “permanent blindness”

A South Carolina couple claims in a proposed federal class-action lawsuit that Amazon sold defective eclipse-watching glasses that partially blinded them during the historic coast-to-coast solar eclipse on August 21.

Corey Payne and fiancée Kayla Harris say in their lawsuit that because of the eyewear Payne purchased from Amazon, the couple is now suffering from “blurriness, a central blind spot, increased sensitivity, changes in perception of color, and distorted vision.”

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