Breath of the Wild will be the first Zelda game with post-launch DLC

Breath of the Wild will be the first Zelda game with post-launch DLC

Breath of the Wild will be the first Zelda game with post-launch DLC

Post-launch downloadable content (DLC) has become almost standard for any kind of big-budget, epic adventure game these days. Nintendo’s popular Zelda series has resisted this trend until now, as the company announced today that Breath of the Wild will see two DLC packs released later this year.

The packs, sold together in a bundle for $19.99, will be released in the summer and the holiday season. Those who purchase them starting on March 3, however, will get instant access to three in-game treasure chests that contain “useful items” and “exclusive in-game clothing.”

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Hackers jailbreak permanent mods onto Super Mario World save files

Hackers jailbreak permanent mods onto Super Mario World save files

Hackers jailbreak permanent mods onto Super Mario World save files

The practice of hacking standard Super Mario World cartridges on stock Super Nintendo hardware has come a long way in a short time. Three years ago, it required a robot entering thousands of button presses per second to insert arbitrary code on top of the game. By last year, streamer SethBling was proving that this kind of code insertion was possible for a human acting with pixel-perfect precision.

Now, SethBling and others in the SMW hacking community have taken things a step further, permanently writing a full hex editor and gameplay mods onto a stock Super Mario World cartridge using nothing but standard controller inputs.

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Full fat version of The Crystal Maze coming to TV screens soon

Full fat version of The Crystal Maze coming to TV screens soon

Full fat version of The Crystal Maze coming to TV screens soon

Start the fans, please! The Crystal Maze is returning to our screens later this year, Channel 4 confirmed on Friday.

The game show, which first aired in 1990, is coming back after a special one-off, celebrity version of the British cult classic pulled in an impressive audience of 4.3 million viewers last autumn.

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The many futures of VR, as seen at the Game Developers Conference

The many futures of VR, as seen at the Game Developers Conference

The many futures of VR, as seen at the Game Developers Conference

At last year’s Game Developers Conference, which took place in the immediate wake of the HTC Vive and Oculus Rift releases, we took some time to highlight all the virtual reality gimmicks that had already taken over the show floor. One year later, this year’s GDC was somehow even more dominated by VR talk and tech.

Everywhere you looked on this year’s GDC show floor, there were companies showing off their own specific ideas of how to improve a consumer VR market that’s still going through plenty of growing pains. There were headsets that offered improved resolution, wireless headsets that tracked movement with built-in cameras, and still other headsets that connected to backpack-mounted laptops. There were the gloves that let you bend your fingers in VR and cameras that let you track your hands without holding anything at all.

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Ruiner review: Cyberpunk bloodbaths have never been prettier

Ruiner review: Cyberpunk bloodbaths have never been prettier

Ruiner review: Cyberpunk bloodbaths have never been prettier

I wish I could go back in time and experience the opening levels of Ruiner for the first time with a controller. The top-down cyberpunk shooter from Reikon Games pretty much demands the fluidity of twin-stick control, even at the cost of mouse-and-keyboard precision. And by “demands,” I mean the game kicked my head in six ways ’til Sunday before I realized the optimal way to play.

The harshness of the action is telegraphed by the harshness of Ruiner‘s tone. The game’s world is as red as Carrie on prom night and puts about as much value on human life. An opening crawl of text warns you that this dystopian future is as much about malice as mega-corporate profit—that hacking into people’s brains and messing up their lives “has never been more fun.”

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Star Wars and Iron Man may not disappear from Netflix in 2019 after all

Star Wars and Iron Man may not disappear from Netflix in 2019 after all

Star Wars and Iron Man may not disappear from Netflix in 2019 after all

Earlier this week, Disney announced plans to pull many of its popular titles from Netflix in 2019 and put them on its own new forthcoming streaming service. While many children’s movies like Frozen and Toy Story 4 won’t be available on Netflix anymore, Star Wars and superhero fans may be in luck. According to a Reuters report, Netflix is in “active discussions” with Disney about securing the rights to Lucasfilm and Marvel titles after 2019.

At the time of Disney’s announcement, Disney Chief Executive Bob Iger said the company hadn’t decided what to do with the rights to Star Wars and Marvel comics films currently on Netflix. The rights could go to Netflix again or to another streaming service—or Disney could keep the rights to use however it pleases. Disney’s new streaming service, which is slated for a 2019 debut, will include all of the “newest live-action and animated movies from Disney and Pixar.”

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Nintendo Switch ships with unpatched 6-month-old WebKit vulnerabilities

Nintendo Switch ships with unpatched 6-month-old WebKit vulnerabilities

Nintendo Switch ships with unpatched 6-month-old WebKit vulnerabilities

Nintendo’s Switch has been out for almost two weeks, which of course means that efforts to hack it are well underway. One developer, who goes by qwertyoruiop on Twitter, has demonstrated that the console ships with months-old bugs in its WebKit browser engine. These bugs allow for arbitrary code execution within the browser. A proof-of-concept explainer video was posted here.

These bugs attracted attention last year because they were used to hijack an iPhone used by a political dissident in the United Arab Emirates; the bugs could allow attackers to steal call histories, texts, contacts and calendar information, and messages from apps like Gmail and WhatsApp. The trio of bugs, collectively known as “Trident,” were disclosed after Apple patched them in iOS 9.3.5 in August of 2016.

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GameStop expects the Switch to be hard to find through 2017

GameStop expects the Switch to be hard to find through 2017

GameStop expects the Switch to be hard to find through 2017

The successful launch of the Nintendo Switch earlier this month is already creating retail shortages and steep markups on the secondary market. Now, major retailer GameStop says it expects those kinds of shortages and nearly instant sell-through of shipments to last throughout 2017 in its more than 7,000 retail stores.

“The demand is incredibly strong for this [Switch] column,” GameStop COO Tony Bartel said in an earnings call yesterday evening. “As soon as we get into our stores, it’s out within hours. We anticipate that we’re going to be chasing supply this entire year.”

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What Xbox Scorpio developers can learn from the world of PC games

What Xbox Scorpio developers can learn from the world of PC games

What Xbox Scorpio developers can learn from the world of PC games

We’ve noted a few times recently how the impending launch of Scorpio is making the Xbox ecosystem look more and more like the tiered PC gaming space. A couple of Microsoft’s first-party developers made that connection more explicit recently, telling Gamasutra that making games for the Scorpio is very similar to the multiple hardware targets seen in PC game development.

Forza developer Turn 10 got a head start on this process by developing Forza Motorsport 6 Apex, a 4K-capable slice of the larger game made for the PC. Making that version of the game forced Turn 10 to “start dealing with all of the wheels that were there for scaling across different PC specs,” studio software architect Chris Tector told Gamasutra.

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Absolver hides its depth and beauty amid obtuse design

Absolver hides its depth and beauty amid obtuse design

Absolver hides its depth and beauty amid obtuse design

Absolver is a game that wants to be very, very many things. I’m just not sure all of those things mesh together very well.

At times, Absolver is a numbers-and-technique-heavy martial arts game. Other times, it’s a serendipitous multiplayer get-together, like Journey. At others still, Absolver is an obtuse single-player adventure in the vein of Dark Souls—complete with loose lore teased out by item descriptions and transient NPCs.

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