How Future Cars Will Predict Your Driving Maneuvers Before You Make Them

How Future Cars Will Predict Your Driving Maneuvers Before You Make Them

How Future Cars Will Predict Your Driving Maneuvers Before You Make Them

Buy a new car these days and the chances are that it will be fitted with an array of driver-assistance technologies. These can match the speed of a car ahead, manage lane changing safely, and even apply the brakes to help prevent a collision. So an interesting question is how much better these safety systems can become before the inevitable occurs and the car takes over completely.

Today we get a partial answer thanks to the work of Ashesh Jain at Cornell University and a few pals, who have developed a system that can predict a human driver’s next maneuver some three seconds before he or she makes it. This information, they say, can then be used to identify and prevent potential accidents.

Read More

AI Algorithm Identifies Humorous Pictures

AI Algorithm Identifies Humorous Pictures

AI Algorithm Identifies Humorous Pictures

Humor is a uniquely human quality. Most people can recognize funny sentences, incidents, pictures, videos, and so on. But it is not always easy to say why these things are humorous.

So it’s easy to imagine that humor will be one of the last bastions that separates humans from machines. Computers, the thinking goes, cannot possibly develop a sense of humor until they can grasp the subtleties of our rich social and cultural settings. And even the most powerful AI machines are surely a long way from that.

Read More

Best of 2015: Data Mining Reveals How Smiling Evolved During a Century of Yearbook Photos

Best of 2015: Data Mining Reveals How Smiling Evolved During a Century of Yearbook Photos

Best of 2015: Data Mining Reveals How Smiling Evolved During a Century of Yearbook Photos

Data mining has changed the way we think about information. Machine-learning algorithms now routinely chomp their way through data sets of Twitter conversations, travel patterns, phone calls, and health records, to name just a few. And the insights this brings is dramatically improving our understanding of communication, travel, health, and so on.

But there is another historical data set that has been largely ignored by the data-mining community—photographs. This presents a more complex challenge.

Read More

Best of 2015: Deep Learning Machine Teaches Itself Chess in 72 Hours, Plays at International Master Level

Best of 2015: Deep Learning Machine Teaches Itself Chess in 72 Hours, Plays at International Master Level

Best of 2015: Deep Learning Machine Teaches Itself Chess in 72 Hours, Plays at International Master Level

It’s been almost 20 years since IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer beat the reigning world chess champion, Gary Kasparov, for the first time under standard tournament rules.  Since then, chess-playing computers have become significantly stronger, leaving the best humans little chance even against a modern chess engine running on a smartphone.

But while computers have become faster, the way chess engines work has not changed. Their power relies on brute force, the process of searching through all possible future moves to find the best next one.

Read More

Best of 2015: Why Self-Driving Cars Must Be Programmed to Kill

Best of 2015: Why Self-Driving Cars Must Be Programmed to Kill

Best of 2015: Why Self-Driving Cars Must Be Programmed to Kill

When it comes to automotive technology, self-driving cars are all the rage. Standard features on many ordinary cars include intelligent cruise control, parallel parking programs, and even automatic overtaking—features that allow you to sit back, albeit a little uneasily, and let a computer do the driving.

So it’ll come as no surprise that many car manufacturers are beginning to think about cars that take the driving out of your hands altogether (see “Drivers Push Tesla’s Autopilot Beyond Its Abilities”). These cars will be safer, cleaner, and more fuel-efficient than their manual counterparts. And yet they can never be perfectly safe.

Read More

AI Machine Learns to Drive Using Crowdteaching

AI Machine Learns to Drive Using Crowdteaching

AI Machine Learns to Drive Using Crowdteaching

This has been the year of the AI machine, and it’s been a rapid change. Artificial intelligence has suddenly begun to match and even outperform humans in tasks where we’ve have always held the upper hand—face recognition, object recognition, language understanding and so on.

And yet there are plenty of complex tasks in which AI machines still trail humans. These range from simple housework such as ironing to more advanced tasks such as driving. The reason for the slow progress in these areas is not that intelligent machines can’t do these tasks. Far from it. It’s because nobody has worked out how to train them.

Read More

How to 3-D-Print a Hydraulic-Powered Robot

How to 3-D-Print a Hydraulic-Powered Robot

How to 3-D-Print a Hydraulic-Powered Robot

Fluid is an important, if underappreciated, component in modern robotics. Its chief role is to generate, control, and transmit power throughout complex devices—an engineering science known as hydraulics.

One problem with hydraulic components is that the pressurized piping required to make it all work is often treated as a system that is more or less independent from the rest of the device.

Read More